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Completely and utterly new

Welcome to the mad world of tri!



My first thoughts are yes you can easily do a super sprint or sprint tri in spring 2010!



I know there are some places that specifically teach adults how to find a bike so do a search on the google so get yourself on one of those!



Ease in with some swimming and walk-jogs. You don't need to be doing anything too formal at the moment. I'd say dabble in bits and pieces of each discipline up until christmas. Build your confidence, if you can get that weight off then great and then in 2010 start doing more specific stuff.



Lots of posts on here so have a good search through the topics and start gleaning off best practices!

Comments

  • Hi



    So I am about 3 stone overweight (doing something about it, half stone down already), have never ridden a bike in my life (am nearly 39) and never done any running - but generally am quite fit (done 2 powerwalking marathons) and have set my heart on doing a Triathlon in the Spring of 2010 (giving myself plenty of time). Guess I just need reassurance that I have not gone completely barking mad and its achievable? Was thinking of starting off on super sprint or sprint distance and see how I go!



    So any advice and training tips would be really helpful right now? The main worry I have is the cycling, and if in a year I can get up to a suitable confidence level to enter a triathlon.



    Thanks.
  • JulesJules Posts: 987
    Welcome!



    You have more than enough time to train for 2010. A bloke called Darren Roberts posts on this forum under the name Conehead. He wrote a book called How Triathlon Ruined My Life. He's off competing in Hawaii at the moment (lucky sod) but if he were about he'd shamelessly plugging his book. It's all about how he trained for an Ironman in six months. Now that is a bit bonkers, but it illustrates what we can all achieve if we put mind to it. The book is funny, and worth reading.



    I'd say to make 2010 your main goal, but to see if you can do a sprint race this year. Just do one if you are concerned about how you will get on, and forget about what time you will want to do it in, just aim to finish. There should be quite a few in August or September, giving you plenty of time to get some training in. Then you'll have an idea of what all the fuss is about and whether you like it or not. You'll also be just about the time all the sales start if you decide you need a new bike, wetsuit, turbo trainer, trisuit etc (the list of "stuff" is endless).
  • moonshinemoonshine Posts: 335
    YES you can most definitely do it and YES you are mad but we all are[:D]



    Feb 1st this year couldn't run, never ridden a geared bike and lets not talk about the swim - had lost 2 1/2 stone



    now can do 29min 5k - started off 50mins, 800m swim slooooowwwly (25mins from 40) and when not having a panic over crawl have learnt to do crawl out of competition and I love my bike so much it caused a row over husband or bike living in the barn -



    so if I can do it you certainly can and could probably do a sprint by the end of this season - go for it[;)]
  • BritspinBritspin Posts: 1,655
    barking mad if you ask me..but you can do it for sure. First goal must be to learn to ride a bike, you really would have your work cut out without that.

    whilst that is taking shape, as suggested run/walk or jog/walk & get inthe pool.

    I would suggest turning up at a local tri to see what goes on, you will learn so much just by watching..just ignore the fast guys with carbon everything..maybe later for them. You will see someone that will remind you of yourself & take encouragement from that...next time it will be you.
  • md6md6 Posts: 969
    You most definately can do it as everyone else has said, and you'll probably find it is highly addictive/life absorbing

    moonshine wrote:
    and I love my bike so much it caused a row over husband or bike living in the barn -





    Moonshine, how's the hubby like the Barn?
  • MillszolaMillszola Posts: 5
    i agree with evrybody above.. you can deffo do this... perhaps even sneak one in this year! i've only ever done 3 triathlons (all this year) and in all of these the thing that struck me is that how open the events are to all levels of ability and how cool all the people seem to be...



    go for it ;-)

  • hazohazo Posts: 18
    You'll be boring your friends with max heart rates, carbo loading and shiney carbon bits before you know it.



    Might be worth considering an Aquathon or duathlon as a stepping stone to tri. You can enter some events as part of a team - not quite so scarey as going it alone.



    Over the last 3 years I've lost 3 stone given up beer and bore my friends with talk of max heart rates, carbo loading ............. you've been warned.



    Best of luck.
  • moonshinemoonshine Posts: 335
    Moonshine, how's the hubby like the Barn?


    much better now he's got some carpet[:D]



    Conehead - what on earth? aren't you being insane in Hawaii
  • diddsdidds Posts: 655
    Yes - you can do it. Definitely.



    How do i know? Because your description of yourself is a description of me not so very long ago. And I've done it, so am sure you can.



    You CAN do it.



    Pick a race from the calendar (http://www.britishtriathlon.org/events/index.php), book it, and prepare for it.



    "Your First triathlon" by Joe Friel (a book!) is a decent read for your undertaking and will provide you with lots of encouragement and advice (as will this forum :-). Similar tomes of course exist (others may be able to recommend some).



    Good luck and welcome to the all encompassing madness! [:D]



    didds









  • rsc198rsc198 Posts: 9
    You'll be fine, as everyone else has said on here its a very open comunity, with people more than happy to give advice and point you in the right direction.

    Don't get caught up in all the buy new kit hype (yes its shiney) but for the most part, unless you expecting to win, then you may as well start with second hand kit (ebay & forum classifieds) whilst you get into the sport... far easier on the wallet!

    Good luck... and enjoy it!

    Ru

  • BexHBexH Posts: 226
    Hey there and welcome! This is definitely do-able- loads of time to get started and loads of helpful advice on here. I went from being a serious pubgoer to someone who can now keep up (sort of!) with the Tri Club runners. I was also overweight and i feel a million times better since starting this triathlon malarkey. Was just having a convo with my mate tonight and worked out that what I spend on Triathlon stuff is less than what I previously spent on beer etc and I know which I'd rather be doing health-wise! Good luck x
  • BlinkybazBlinkybaz Posts: 1,144
    I cant believe we are labelling are selves as mad! Maybe a bit bonkers! Acyually thinking back about some my TRI and training de=reams I could do with a therapist!!LOL



    soo of course you can do a Tri in spring 2010! A super sprint would be a great starting point!



    Be so carefull with the training! A little to build up is the best bet to avoid unjury! The best thing to do is read this forum everyday and ask what you feel you need to know! No questions is silly and we have all been in the same situation!



    Which race are you planning to do?
  • shadowone1shadowone1 Posts: 1,408
    Hey,



    Well done for taking some positive action in your life. Welcome to the mad world of triathlon.



    You can do it, you will do it, so go and do it.



    If you want to achieve it then you will, don't let others say otherwise.



    This is the best place for advice/ encouragement/ let some steam off etc.



    Congrats and welcome.
  • WOW what a welcome, thanks everyone. I am going to watch a local triathlon at the end of next month to get a feel for what its all about. I don't really have much money most of the time, so any kit I need to get will be ebay, classified etc, although I can get a good deal on a bike via the cyclescheme at work (40-50% off retail price). My friends hubby is ex cycling veteran champion so he's going to teach me to ride a bike, which is obviously my biggest obstacle at the moment and the bit I need to work on the most, then the running then the swimming. I swim once a week as it is, I think my swim will be the strongest element for me, but you never know I might take to cycling like a duck to water!! Don't know until I try! Have decided to wait until another stone is off me then follow a walk to run programme and get into the running that way. I had glandular fever late last year so still working on raising my fitness levels and cardiovascular fitness at the minute. Current programme is swim once a week, DVD (stuff like Billy Blanks) once a week and 2 gym sessions a week, I see that becoming more triathlon specific towards the end of the year.



    I'm sure I'll be on here loads bugging you with various questions, talking of which any TV channels have triathlons on regularly so I can watch? Thanks guys.
  • Oh and I'll pop to the library to pick up those books mentioned!
  • gomiboygomiboy Posts: 59
    You've absolutely got the time to train for this, so don't worry too much.



    My 2p of training advice, after being in this mad, addictive sport for 5 years now, is:

    220Triathlon.com has a great beginner's download available on the left-hand column of the home page, and there are loads of good books out there with training plans in them, including 'How Triathlon Ruined my Life' (shameless plug on Conehead's behalf since he's off in Hawaii doing insane things), to read about this crazy sport. I'd highly recommend creating a plan and then trying to stick to it. But don't go crazy - reasonable goals are loads more likely to be achieved.



    Rather than wait until you've lost all the weight you want, add training into your plan *for* losing the weight. That way you don't have to start from a position of being 'thin' but having no muscle or basic fitness.



    If you sign up for a sprint triathlon in May or June 2010 now, you'll have a target to shoot for as well which might help with solidifying your training plan and commitment.



    Learning how to cycle will probably be your toughest thing to try to do. The cycling part of a triathlon is a major part of it, but for your first triathlon people do it all kinds of ways. Don't stress about this too hugely, but do make sure to put learning to cycle as early as possible into your training plan.



    For your first bike purchase, I would recommend a good cross-over or 'city' bike; mountain-bike style, but with road tyres rather than off-road tyres. I would ABSOLUTELY NOT go for a road bike or a triathlon-specific bike. They're much more technical to ride, much easier to wreck on, and you won't see the benefits of the extra money you'll spend for a good long time.



    I would also increase the swim time before anything else. Swimming is the lowest impact, and technique makes the biggest difference, so practicing the swim lots and lots will give you a really good return on your investment. It is also a great way to improve cardio fitness, and doesn't do the same potential damage as running or gym or like that. But I'm not talking about just paddling around in the pool - you need to get a proper swim workout plan and try to stick to it.



    I'm of the Tiger Woods school of training. Learn what part of your sport you are naturally good at, and then become great at that. Spend just enough time to not make a total fool out of yourself in everything else. Tiger has a fantastic long game, but his short game and especially his putting is not nearly as good as some other pro golfers. So rather than work on improving his short game, he worked on making his long game the best in the world and just spend enough time on his short game to not lose points there. Triathlon Example - I suck at running. I'm really really slow. It takes me over an hour to run 10km; usually my 'long' training runs are hours long but only cover medium distances. However, I am much much stronger at cycling, and my swimming is OK. If I can spend an extra hour a week and shave 20 minutes off the bike, or spend the same extra training time and shave 10 minutes off the run, it's more cost-effective for me to work on cycling and will do me better for the race as a whole.



    Finally, practice transitions. It's the little-understood (by neophytes) 4th discipline of triathlon. My first tri, I lost 15 minutes of totally wasted time, doing stupid things like completely changing my clothes, putting stuff on my feet to prevent blisters, drinking water, etc... all of which I could have done either before the start or on the bike or not at all. Practice this as well - yes, you'll look silly, but it's worth it and a cheap way to shave time off your race.



    Just another 2p of training advice from antoher total stranger wishing you well - you'll get lots and lots of both here!



    Welcome to the addiction.
  • andyb99andyb99 Posts: 229
    i honestly think you should have a go at a supersprint event this year...i'm doing liverpool in june and although i'm apprehensive, the training is great and if i didn't have the goal i'd not be doing half of it.



    Money doesnt matter much, i got my wetsuit off ebay for £25...it fits fine, it's not a pro one but it does its job (i had my first OW swim in the Albert dock this weekend just gone)



    what you'll realise its its full of people just like me and you......not people trying to break records....but people just looking to finish, who've taken up the sport to get fitter, lose weight and keep out of the pub.



    I'm 39.....had to give up football at 35 cause of a back injury and have piled it on since then....if i can do it you can do it.



    why not hit the roads now...and focus yourself for 8 or 10 weeks...and maybe try a supersprint event in september (www.fun2try.co.uk has some listings)...you'll be absolutly amazed at how quick you improve on all the disciplines you think you cant do.



    Good luck
  • gdh250467gdh250467 Posts: 237
    I'd recommend taking up the tip from andyb99 and have a look at www.fun2tri.co.uk. These are all pool based sprints, and each swimmer starts 15 or 20 seconds after one another. This means that once you've started, it's almost impossible for spectators to work out whether you are fast ar slow, as it's difficult to compare one against the other. In a mass start it's easier to get a direct comparison.



    They also do 'fun' triathlons which is a hald distance swim (200m) and a half distance run (2.5km).



    Signing up now would give you a target to achieve this year, show any weaknesses that you can work on over the winter / spring to be race ready for a longer disctance rac early 2010.

  • FlavadaveFlavadave Posts: 749
    Welcome and good luck! I fully anticipate you'll be hooked before you know it and spending hours a day on this forum or eyeing up 'essential' triathlon gear on t'internet.



    Also, get used to showering 2-3 times a day (2 for 1 on radox showergel in Boots at the moment) and smelling of chlorine constantly.



    Is it just me or does anyone else actually quite like the smell?
  • Thanks guys for all the tips, gonna ring my friends hubby today to get my first cycling lesson booked it, I'm itching to get started now!!



    Would you suggest swimming lessons also to help improve on my technique, Ive got 3 stroke breathing mastered now but feel I can improve on my technique. I'm up to swimming 900m in one go at the moment.
  • FlavadaveFlavadave Posts: 749
    mysteriousmillie wrote:


    Would you suggest swimming lessons also to help improve on my technique,





    Yes! If you can afford it definitely. Swimming efficiently is all about technique. And its not necessarily about posting the fastest time, but more about getting out of the water in a decent state so that you can cycle and run afterwards.



  • gdh250467gdh250467 Posts: 237
    If you're swimming 900m's already, and supersprints are only 400m or 'fun' only 200m, I'd concentrate on the other two disciplines as a priority.
  • FlavadaveFlavadave Posts: 749
    And that too!
  • julesojuleso Posts: 279
    When you do feel up to a bit of running, I'd recommend the run/walk programmes on the Runner's World website. Free to download and really helpful.



    And you're swimming 900m in one go? Impressive stuff; I can't do that and I've got my first sprint in a week or so! Do get your technique looked at though, especially if it's been a while since you had a lesson.



    Good luck with the cycling. You'll love it! I anticipate questions about lady saddles and cycling shorts imminently......
  • BlinkybazBlinkybaz Posts: 1,144
    As a bad swimmer I would defo suggest swim lessons. Also any other lessons you can get your hands on. Conehead has a rookie day happening down south soon. I would get on that too!



    You need to think like a triathlete to succeed and by the sounds of it you embrassing this! Good luck with it all! Sime of us on here are either newbies in are first season or second so we know where you are coming from.
  • juleso wrote:


    When you do feel up to a bit of running, I'd recommend the run/walk programmes on the Runner's World website. Free to download and really helpful.



    And you're swimming 900m in one go? Impressive stuff; I can't do that and I've got my first sprint in a week or so! Do get your technique looked at though, especially if it's been a while since you had a lesson.



    Good luck with the cycling. You'll love it! I anticipate questions about lady saddles and cycling shorts imminently......



    Thanks for that have printed it off. Although I can swim 900m I am very tired at the end of it (and it takes me 45 mins so not fast but feel I can vastly improve on this by the time the event comes round next year), so definintely need to work on my cardiovascular fitness. Later in the year will invest in some swimming lessons to hone in my technique and stick to swimming once a week for the time being.
  • ZacniciZacnici Posts: 1,385
    I think I have lost something like 2-3 stones in weight since taking up triathlon, can't quite remember what my 'blimp' weight was (just creeps on as you get older- yipes) but it was something like 13 stone or so. I am now 10 and a halfish or 65-67Kg - still struggling with my little belly roll. Anyway keep up the training, you will start to feel better after the initial 'gut spewing what the hell am I doing?' phase.



    Did my first tri when I was 49 on a £60 Halfords MTB and loved it. I did that with only a few weeks preparation so I echo my fellow insanes that you may wish to contemplate a Super Sprint or two this year, 200-250m pool swim, 10Km bike and 2 1/2 run, you will learn so much from that and next year you will be able to start with a much stronger footing.



    As Conehead says, welcome and keep your cheque open, credit cards to hand, sell your spouse/partner, children, dog - no keep the dog, a dog will listen as you talk endlessly about bricks, techniques etc.
  • Zacnici wrote:


    I think I have lost something like 2-3 stones in weight since taking up triathlon, can't quite remember what my 'blimp' weight was (just creeps on as you get older- yipes) but it was something like 13 stone or so. I am now 10 and a halfish or 65-67Kg - still struggling with my little belly roll. Anyway keep up the training, you will start to feel better after the initial 'gut spewing what the hell am I doing?' phase.



    Did my first tri when I was 49 on a £60 Halfords MTB and loved it. I did that with only a few weeks preparation so I echo my fellow insanes that you may wish to contemplate a Super Sprint or two this year, 200-250m pool swim, 10Km bike and 2 1/2 run, you will learn so much from that and next year you will be able to start with a much stronger footing.



    As Conehead says, welcome and keep your cheque open, credit cards to hand, sell your spouse/partner, children, dog - no keep the dog, a dog will listen as you talk endlessly about bricks, techniques etc.



    I'll sell my mother but never my dog!!! [:D]
  • Jack HughesJack Hughes Posts: 1,262
    I'm a bit late to the party (poor connectivity for the last few weeks).. and I think most of what I was going to say as been covered. But, what the heck, my [email protected]



    - Of course you can do it!

    - But, break the goal down into lots of little steps, so that the final goal doesn't seem too far away.. which, in bleaker moments, it might well do.



    - Good to see that you've got someone to help with the bike - I was going to suggest borrowing a family members, finding some level ground, and just push off and go. It will take a bit of getting used to, be prepared for the odd mishap, and don't let your embarassment/frustration get in the way. It will seem hard and first, then it will suddenly click, and you will be away. Surround yourself with people who can give you advice.



    - Swimming: lessons help - but you are probably an OK swimmer? You local council may well do a swimming development programme if you are a beginner there. These are cost effective, and even if you are quite competent already, you get a pool pretty much to yourself (well, compared with normal sessions) and it is cheap!



    - I was also going to suggest walk then run. The excess weight will make the running harder at first. And you also have to be careful to avoid injuries. A really good thing would be to look at www.parkrun.com. This has the slogan "walk, jog, run" or something like that. Very friendly, and a great way to see improvements. It's 5km. You can start off walking. Then start to run a bit. And each time, you will see an improvement.



    - Buying Kit. Don't for a bit. As your body shape changes, the kit you have bought will become useless, quickly. What you do want to buy though, is some decent running shoes, and a good sports bra for your shape. These are essential to avoid injury. Just wear whatever you feel comfortable in.



    - Diet. Part of the fun of it. You need to eat/drink better, as well as exercise more. But you will find that is a virtuous circle! The fitter you get, the easier it is too lose weight. Don't worry too much about diet plans. It does help to record what you eat/drink as well as exercise. Try to make some simple changes - less fizzy drinks, less alchohol, more vegetables. If you are not a cook, then you might want to have a go at learning how to prepare some simple healthy meals (I don't mean to be patronising here, but there are bound to be other people in a similar situation reading this).



    - Support (it's going to be hard to do it all on your own). Well, you've found the right place for that. It's going to be challenging for you - but just come here with any issues, or if you need to let off steam - you'll find plenty of sympathetic ears! Report back on what you've done, and we're all bound to chip in with encouraging words and advice!



    Good luck, and have fun!
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