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Can I go straight into a big ride on a TT bike

I have recently sold my road bike and bought the TT bike for the IM I plan to do next year.
My mate is doing the Manchester to Blackpool ride this weekend and is goading me into doing it. Can I just go into a ride of that distance without any training or getting used to the bike? I've not even done a ride of that distance to be honest although previous to selling the roadie I was getting decent 30 milers in over some tough hills and i'm a pretty fit lad.
The distance isnt really my issue, its more will I be able to cope with the bike and the position over that distance?
Any help would be appreciated

Comments

  • willieverfinishwillieverfinish Posts: 1,381
    Of course. Don't expect to be on the bars for a huge amount of time.

    Sit up and stretch - enjoy it. It'll be an indicator to what hurts!

    60 miles isn't it ? Hammer time Itsba 3/5 or difficulty so not too bad. Is your mate expecting you to ride it with him ?

    If it's an organised ride then I'd check with the organisers as some don't allow TT bikes for group riding.

    What TT bike did you get btw ? You will be quicker I can guarantee once you've dialled yourself in to the new position. Good luck
  • Dan684Dan684 Posts: 28
    Hi mate,

    Yeah I've kinda just got that train of though. If doing IM next year I'll have to ride double that distance so should give me a good indicator.
    I got a Planet X stealth, some upgrades too, rotor cranks, new seat and some others. Anyway I don't think I'll be riding with my friend, he's (even) less experienced than me and to be honest I'm that kind of person who doesn't like getting beat and anything and I put everything into sports so I'll more than likely be close to a coma by the time I finish haha (despite my horrendous time)
  • willieverfinishwillieverfinish Posts: 1,381
    Cool

    Just double check you can ride a TT bike

    Unless our coughing or shitting up your heart & lungs at the finish then you've not gone hard enough
  • Dan684Dan684 Posts: 28
    willieverfinish wrote:
    Cool

    Just double check you can ride a TT bike

    Unless our coughing or shitting up your heart & lungs at the finish then you've not gone hard enough
    Well that seems to be pretty easy for me

    I'm probably going to do it so I shall let you know how I get on
  • willieverfinishwillieverfinish Posts: 1,381
    Jobs a good un then
  • Shouldn't you at least have a bike fit first??



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  • HarryDHarryD Posts: 419
    Dan

    The revised geometry will place different strains on your muscles, ligaments tendons and joints so its not ideal to do a 'big bang' bike ride on your TT bike even if you have had a professional bike set up. I know because my knees hurt quite badly after doing a similar but less challenging ride on a new TT. A professional bike fitter would advise building up gradually on your new bike in the same way you don't buy running shoes to run in a marathon later that day.

    Consider spinning at a higher cadence to reduce the forces through your joints without loosing power and sit right back on your seat to reduce the knee flexion.

    Have a great ride - the weather looks excellent

    HarryD
  • Dan684Dan684 Posts: 28
    Just to let you all know I completed the 62 miles today in a time of 3hrs 29mins. Not the greatest time I am we'll aware but taking into consideration the fact that the furthest I have ridden in my life was 28miles, I haven't rode a bike for at least 6 weeks and have never touched a TT bike before I'm relatively pleased with that.
    Funnily enough found the aero position quite comfortable (only a sore him to complain about)
    Dan
  • I've ridden three aero / TT bikes now for several years and always have a blast with my friends at races or on a spin-out, just because, once you're comfortable, your TT will take you along the flat or down a hill much faster. Remember, if your upper arms aren't vertical, you're switchers are too far away and need to be shortened. Getting comfy is the key, don't over stretch your reach - that'll give you a bad back, get used to it (riding aero I mean) to avoid a sore neck, and yes, as someone else has said, you're not down on the horns ALL the time - you are allowed to sit up, stretch, take on some food. Because you're presenting a much more aero shape to the leading edge of the bike, it's actually a very efficient use of your body anyway, so proportionately you'll actually use less energy than someone riding a road bike. Simples
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